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Featured Articles

Communicating to customers with charities

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The final installment in a four-part series discussing best retailer practices as the spokesperson for your business. 

After dedicating most of their careers to the gem and jewelry industry, Tyna and Bert Wheat opened The Diamond Galleria in 2013. In five short years, they have a thriving and profitable fine jewelry store. Based on their decades of collective industry experience, affiliations with trade associations and buying groups, and an expansive cause marketing-based business model, they’ve become known throughout Evansville, IN (and the tri-state area) as caring business owners that support a number of area non-profits and local aid organizations.


Metal Marketplace International celebrating 40 years and 20,000 customers

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Metal Marketplace International (MMI), a leading supplier of gold and silver in the United States, started 40 years ago in Philadelphia as a company named Anthony’s Coins. Anthony’s Coins bought scrap gold, platinum and silver and bought and sold rare coins in gold and silver. The company also sold new and used jewelry.

Retailer Roundtable: What have been your most effective ways of reducing aged inventory?

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Q: What have been your most effective ways of reducing aged inventory? 

“We run inventory reports using The Edge to determine our aged inventory. Like most jewelers, when inventory hasn’t sold in the store for one year, it’s considered aged inventory. In the past, we’d label the item as a ‘clearance’ piece in the case it was originally displayed in. We still do that. But in July, we created a new clearance case. To give the case more attention we moved it from the back of the store to the front. Response to the new case has been faint so far, but this is still a very new way of addressing old inventory for our store and a lot of customers haven’t had a chance to see it.

Jeweler puts it ‘all out there,’ takes risks when talking jewelry to his market

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Part 3 of a 4-part series discussing best retailer practices as the spokesperson for your business

When a “major player” competitor moved to town, Jason Druxman and his business partners knew they had to up their game in reaching out to their Appleton, Wisconsin customer base. Acting on the advice of trusted retail advisers, Jason became the face and voice of Avenue Jewelers in 2003 to take on the new jeweler in town. 

Education shines at the Fall 2018 Atlanta Jewelry

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(ATLANTA) - Education and an emphasis on community-wide learning proved to be a winning combination for the Fall 2018 Atlanta Jewelry Show. 

Tracking evenly with the August 2017 edition, the final attendance numbers at the August 4-6 Atlanta Jewelry Show was not the big news. Rather, it was the upbeat atmosphere and reports of steady order-writing and growing retail attendance from outside the show’s traditional region that had exhibitors talking in the aisles.

S.C. Lowcountry jeweler Keenan Harn brings new energy to Carolina Jewelers Alliance

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HarnExecutive Director of the Carolina Jewelers Alliance Keenan Harn and husband, Jason Harn. The couple are the owners of Loy Harn Jewelers.Keenan Harn, Executive Director of the Carolina Jewelers Alliance (CJA), is serious about drawing retailers to the Aug. 25 convention at The Ballantyne in Charlotte, scheduling the event back-to-back with the Southeastern Jewelers Organization (SJO) show and offering some pretty amazing incentives.

Retailer Roundtable: What is your reaction to De Beers’ announcement on selling lab-grown diamond jewelry?

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“De Beers made a brilliant move. They’ve completely upended the lab-grown diamond business. When a company can make large-sized lab-grown diamonds and produce them quickly, they will control the market. If you factor in all the producers of lab-grown diamonds, this pre-JCK Show announcement – which was also incredible timing – may take lab-grown diamonds down the same path as cubic zirconia. When CZs hit the market, they were $200 to $300 per stone. Now they’re dollars per stone, and that’s for the better ones.

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